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shared commissary kitchen

Austin’s Shared Kitchens – What They Are and How They Can Help Your Operation

A shared kitchen can provide a place to customize your meal and grow your business. Maybe your restaurant customers have asked you to add more deliveries or cater for private parties and events. However, you may not have enough space in the kitchen for all the necessary preparations. Or maybe you have a dream to open a restaurant but want to start a catering business first to build your reputation and customer base. The shared kitchen in Austin can be the answer.

What is a shared kitchen?

Shared kitchens are becoming increasingly popular and can be anything from another restaurant with a kitchen area available on certain days and times, to a large kitchen open to all types of food business owners. Shared kitchen facilities can vary widely in size and amount of available cooking equipment and storage, both dry and refrigerated. 

The types of customers they serve also vary from place to place. For example, some soup kitchens cater primarily to bakers; others to food truck operators, and some to food retail startups and catering facilities. In all cases, community kitchens are licensed and verified commercial kitchens that are rented by the hour and per day, week, or month.

Is a shared kitchen model right for me?

Renting kitchen space makes the most sense when you simply don’t have the room or the right equipment to cater an event. The advantage of a shared kitchen is that you only use and pay for it when you need it, so you don’t have the overhead of maintaining that space and equipment yourself.  

Still, rates to use shared kitchen spaces vary (see below), and you’ll need to determine if the event is large enough to generate the income necessary to offset your costs.  If you’re catering to small parties, a shared kitchen may make less sense; instead, you might be able to find a restaurant willing to give you time in its kitchen during off-hours, either for a smaller fee or in trade for something you can offer the restaurant. 




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